Year 5 Home Learning Statements

Term Four

Writing

Students will be exploring poetry and speech writing.

 

In poetry, we have been looking at some of our favourite authors; from Shakespeare to Roald Dahl, Henry Lawson to Michael Rosin. Students have looked at haikus, lyric, imagery, free verse and skills such as alliteration, visualisation, rhythm and rhyme.

 

Our speech writing unit is designed to develop confidence in public speaking. Students  will use topics they are familiar with and share their work in small groups, leading to the creation of a persuasive speech that they will present to grade 4 and 5 students as part of their 2020 Fairfield Primary School leadership campaign.

 

To support this at home:

Both of these units have performance elements to them. Provide you child opportunities to take centre stage with informal and formal performances to the family. Ask them to:

  • Tell you everything the know about a particular topic, with a focus on mentally structuring the speech (introduction, information, conclusion).
  • Create a poem to read or memorise and recite with an engaging performance.
  • Write a short persuasive about something you are passionate about (climate change, sports, Christmas menu, etc.). Present this to an audience who can share some warm and cool feedback.

 

Mathematics

In term four, Year 5 will be exploring measurement and number and algebra with a focus on angles, patterns and the order of operations.

In measurement, students will explore transformation, angles, and location. They will experience this through manually flipping, sliding and turning two-dimensional shapes as well as identifying coordinates on a map.

To support this at home:

  • When travelling to events and activities or playing games, focus on the language of location such as; south, east, west, north (and specifics northwest, north-north west), etc. Incorporate angle names (obtuse, reflex, rotation, acute) and approximate degrees of a turn. For example, when taking a turn, you may ask, “Which direction are we now facing? (from North to West) How far did we turn? (90 degrees) What sort of an angle is that?” (Right angle)
  • Or when taking a shot at the soccer goals set up some acute (less than 45 degree) angle goal challenges. Record your results and for fun turn them into percentages. How accurate are you at acute angles?
  • Look at a map and discuss how to read it. Look at the coordinates and find where your house is in relation to school.

 

In Number and Algebra, students have been working on algebraic patterns, formulas and identifying and creating rules.

To support this at home:

  • Engage your child in conversation about interesting patterns you see around you. From odd numbers on houses e.g. X = odd number + 2, to number plate combinations e.g. 248 (a doubling pattern) you can try create a rule for the patterns you see. The idea for this conversation is to become familiar with seeing letters as missing information, much like an empty box. This familiarisation will assist in demystifying any worries about algebra. The more interesting the patterns you see, the more complex the rule you can create. “I saw three red cars (Y) for every white car (X).” X = 1  Y=3. If I saw 5 white cars, how many red cars would I see based on my original rule?

 

Other resources to support learning include:

  • Algebra in daily life: this link has some great everyday algebra application ideas.
  • Reading and understanding fractions/decimals in real life contexts. E.g. baking, percentage discounts, measurements, etc.

 

Term Three

Writing

Our focus this term is Fractured Fairy Tales. During the explore stage of the unit we learn about the five motifs (characters, objects, light vs dark, patterns of 3 and 7, morals) that define a fairy tale.

 

Students will be using comparing and contrasting skills to plan their very own fractured fairy tale, with the challenge of balancing enough change, so that it is recognisable but not completely changed. Within this genre, we explore different sentence types (simple, compound and complex) and introduce vocabulary that will enhance and enrich their writing for the audience.

 

To support your child with this work at home you can:

  • Read and discuss traditional and modern fairy tales.
  • Investigate how fairy tales have change over time.
  • Identify motifs.
  • Write a new beginning/ending for your favourite fairy tale.
  • Introduce a new character and write how they impact the tale.
  • Role-play a fairy tale/reader’s theatre.

 

Mathematics

In term three, Year 5 will be exploring fractions and decimals, for example, comparing and ordering fractions and placing them on a number line, addition and subtraction of fractions with the same denominator and comparing representing and ordering decimals. Students may need further practise identifying visual representation (e.g. a pizza cut into quarters with one piece shaded) with the number representation of ¼, or expressing groups as a fraction. While other students will explore adding, subtracting, multiplying fractions, finding lowest common denominators through equivalent fraction knowledge.

 

In addition to this, we are working on Measurement with a focus on perimeter and area. Students will continue to explore that perimeter is the outside of common shapes and compound shapes. They will also experience using the formula: area = length x width to find the coverage of a space.

 

To support your child with this work at home you can:

  • Experiment with fractions in real life contexts. Read a recipe and measure out the ingredients while discussing fractions. “The cup is 1/8 full” or for a recipe that needs twice as many diners will need to be doubled.
  • Estimate and measure the perimeter of objects around the house (tables, tiles, rooms, TV screens).
  • Estimate and measure the area of the same object using the formula.
  • Have a growth mindset and conversation about maths.
  • Encourage persistence.
  • Visiting learning websites such as Khan Academy, Study Ladder.
  • Practise multiplication and division facts (up to 10×10).

Term Two

Writing

In writing we are focusing on the Historical Fiction. The students will investigate the structure, features and themes of this genre, such as hardship, freedom and friendship. Students will use research skills to find facts that will be support the inevitability of their story.

 

To support this at home:

  • Visit the local library and borrow historical fiction texts to immerse themselves in this genre.
  • Discuss themes within these texts.
  • Interview a family member who has personal experience about an historical event (if possible).
  • Research a particular event or significant person that interests your child (Gold Rush, Eureka Stockade, Peter Lalor, effects on Aboriginal people, population and migration changes).
  • Provide opportunities to write stories that suit the structure and features that we will explore in class.
  • Read over your child’s work and encourage student self-editing.

 

Mathematics

In Number we are focusing on multiplication and division. The students will explore a range of different strategies to support their understanding of these operations. These will include; grouping and skip counting, combining numbers (arrays), using array flash cards, solving word problems, division with remainders, halving and doubling. We are also making links to perimeter and area.

 

To support this at home:

  • Have a positive mind set and conversation about maths.
  • Encourage persistence.
  • Review the multiplication grid 10 x 10 chart.
  • Doubling as a multiplication strategy (e.g. 8 x 2 = 16).
  • Halving (dividing by 2) 16 ÷ 2 = 8.
  • Creating Facts Families (e.g. 8×3=24, 3×8=24, 24÷3=8, 24÷8=3).
  • Estimation of shapes, areas within and outside of the home / sports fields / music studios.
  • Conversations including area and perimeter vocabulary.

 

Term One

Reading
In reading we are setting up independent reading structures and agreements, tracking thinking and strategy of questioning.  Later in the term, we introduce predicting, activate prior knowledge, note visualisations and write summaries.

 

To support this at home:

  • Ask your child about the books they are reading at school (literature circle books, class shared texts, and those borrowed from the library). Check in to see if they are reading fiction and non-fiction. Which do they prefer?
  • Discuss what they think the themes are in the book. Why?
  •  Have your child share what they are thinking while reading the text? Perhaps predictions, unknown words, summaries, text to text/self/world connections.
  •  Find out the before, during and after questions they had?
  • Listen to your child read short snippets of their book. Encourage them to slow down at punctuation and read accurately.  Listen for fluency.

 

Mathematics

In number, we are focusing on place value. Place value is important as it helps students to understand the meaning and order of numbers. We work up to and beyond the value of numbers to hundreds of thousands and to the thousandths with decimal fractions. Understanding the value of smaller numbers, including decimals can be very difficult for students as it becomes difficult to model the relative size of those numbers.

 

Links between place value and addition are currently being made, including applying understandings of place value to solve addition and subtraction problems. We are also making links between 2D shapes and 3D objects and how they can be categorised.

 

To support this at home:

  • Have a positive mind set and conversation about maths.
  • Encourage persistence
  • Talk Numbers – the date, temperature, UV ratings, years people were born.
  • Ask your child to explain the different ways they can tell you the value of a number: (e.g. 873 – can be explained as 7 tens or 70 ones)
  • When spotting number plates (or other numbers) ask what is the largest rearranged number you can make, as well as the smallest and even the difference between the two.
  • Using four and five digit numbers, partition the number and write the number in words. (e.g. 4,213:4 thousands, 2 hundreds, 1 ten and 3 ones | Four thousand two hundred and thirteen.)
  • Play games that involve mental addition and subtraction of three and four digit numbers.
  • Try to identify two-dimensional shapes within three-dimensional objects.  Discuss similarities and differences between three-dimensional objects around the house. Examine the properties of the three-dimensional objects and discuss how their properties might be related to their purpose.