Year 5 Home Learning Statements

Term Two

Writing

In writing we are focusing on the Historical Fiction. The students will investigate the structure, features and themes of this genre, such as hardship, freedom and friendship. Students will use research skills to find facts that will be support the inevitability of their story.

 

To support this at home:

  • Visit the local library and borrow historical fiction texts to immerse themselves in this genre.
  • Discuss themes within these texts.
  • Interview a family member who has personal experience about an historical event (if possible).
  • Research a particular event or significant person that interests your child (Gold Rush, Eureka Stockade, Peter Lalor, effects on Aboriginal people, population and migration changes).
  • Provide opportunities to write stories that suit the structure and features that we will explore in class.
  • Read over your child’s work and encourage student self-editing.

 

Mathematics

In Number we are focusing on multiplication and division. The students will explore a range of different strategies to support their understanding of these operations. These will include; grouping and skip counting, combining numbers (arrays), using array flash cards, solving word problems, division with remainders, halving and doubling. We are also making links to perimeter and area.

 

To support this at home:

  • Have a positive mind set and conversation about maths.
  • Encourage persistence.
  • Review the multiplication grid 10 x 10 chart.
  • Doubling as a multiplication strategy (e.g. 8 x 2 = 16).
  • Halving (dividing by 2) 16 ÷ 2 = 8.
  • Creating Facts Families (e.g. 8×3=24, 3×8=24, 24÷3=8, 24÷8=3).
  • Estimation of shapes, areas within and outside of the home / sports fields / music studios.
  • Conversations including area and perimeter vocabulary.

Term One

Reading
In reading we are setting up independent reading structures and agreements, tracking thinking and strategy of questioning.  Later in the term, we introduce predicting, activate prior knowledge, note visualisations and write summaries.

 

To support this at home:

  • Ask your child about the books they are reading at school (literature circle books, class shared texts, and those borrowed from the library). Check in to see if they are reading fiction and non-fiction. Which do they prefer?
  • Discuss what they think the themes are in the book. Why?
  •  Have your child share what they are thinking while reading the text? Perhaps predictions, unknown words, summaries, text to text/self/world connections.
  •  Find out the before, during and after questions they had?
  • Listen to your child read short snippets of their book. Encourage them to slow down at punctuation and read accurately.  Listen for fluency.

 

Mathematics

In number, we are focusing on place value. Place value is important as it helps students to understand the meaning and order of numbers. We work up to and beyond the value of numbers to hundreds of thousands and to the thousandths with decimal fractions. Understanding the value of smaller numbers, including decimals can be very difficult for students as it becomes difficult to model the relative size of those numbers.

 

Links between place value and addition are currently being made, including applying understandings of place value to solve addition and subtraction problems. We are also making links between 2D shapes and 3D objects and how they can be categorised.

 

To support this at home:

  • Have a positive mind set and conversation about maths.
  • Encourage persistence
  • Talk Numbers – the date, temperature, UV ratings, years people were born.
  • Ask your child to explain the different ways they can tell you the value of a number: (e.g. 873 – can be explained as 7 tens or 70 ones)
  • When spotting number plates (or other numbers) ask what is the largest rearranged number you can make, as well as the smallest and even the difference between the two.
  • Using four and five digit numbers, partition the number and write the number in words. (e.g. 4,213:4 thousands, 2 hundreds, 1 ten and 3 ones | Four thousand two hundred and thirteen.)
  • Play games that involve mental addition and subtraction of three and four digit numbers.
  • Try to identify two-dimensional shapes within three-dimensional objects.  Discuss similarities and differences between three-dimensional objects around the house. Examine the properties of the three-dimensional objects and discuss how their properties might be related to their purpose.