Year 1/2 Home Learning Statements

Term Four

Writing

This term our focuses are Narrative and Persuasive writing. Speak with your child about their individualised writing goal and discuss strategies they are learning to develop their writing.

 

Narrative Writing is an imagined story that has characters. In our author talk with Sally Rippin, she explained that ideas for narratives come from two places; our imaginations or our experiences. Many stories are a combination of both. Narratives are organised into three parts, an orientation (used to introduce the characters and the setting), a complication (where something goes wrong) and a resolution (where the problem/s are solved).

To support this at home:

  • Read some narratives and discuss the events and characters.
  • Discuss ideas and events that they could write about.
  • Encourage your child to write narratives.

 

Persuasive writing is used to express a point of view and persuade your reader to adopt your perspective. A persuasive text is organised to include a statement of position, arguments and a concluding statement.

To support this at home:

  • Share some persuasive texts e.g. Advertisements on TV or print media.
  • Encourage your child to verbally persuade you to let them do something (increase pocket money, new bike, etc.) with justifiable and valid arguments.
  • Encourage your child to notice the features of a persuasive text (emotive language, bold writing and fact and opinion) in all text types.
  • Create a debate/general conversation around topics such as cats are better than dogs, scooters are better than bikes.

 

Mathematics

Time: Students will be learning to read the time on an analogue clock. The progression that students will move through is first reading o’clock times, then half past, then quarter hour, then 5 minute, then minute and lastly solving time duration problems (e.g. if I need to be at basketball at 5 o’clock and it takes me 15 minutes to get there, what time would I need to leave?). Reading time on analogue clocks is a difficult concept as the two hands on a clock can be confusing. To support students, encourage them to look at the hour hand (the smaller hand) first and then the minute hand (longer hand).

To support this at home you may:

  • Practise reading times starting at o’clock then building to half past, quarter to/past and 5 minute times.
  • Skip counting by 5s can be a good way to practise for reading minute time.

 

Place Value: Place value means the value of the digit changes depending on its position within a number. For example, the number 23 is made up of 2 tens and 3 ones, not just a 2 and a 3. It is important for students to be able to break numbers up into their parts so they are able to apply their knowledge to solve number problems.

To support this at home you may:

  • Use playing cards to make 2 or three digit numbers and ask your child to read the number and say the value of each digit.
  • You could extend this by asking them to find the number that would be 10 more/10 less.
  • Play ‘Guess My Number’. Choose a secret number, and students have to guess the number using place value to describe the number. For example, “Is there a 2 in the hundreds place”.

 

Counting is always an important skill and very useful to practise. Students are practising counting forwards and backwards by 1s and skip counting by 2s, 3s, 5s and 10s.

To support this at home you may:

  • Count by different patterns each time you walk to/from school.
  • Play a game such as ‘Beat Your Score’. Students choose a counting pattern to count by. They count for 1 minute and record their counting. When the timer goes off, reset the timer and students count by the same counting pattern; trying to beat their previous score.
  • Ask your child to teach you some of the counting patterns they have learnt in class.

 

Term Three

Writing

This term we are focusing on Persuasive writing and Information reports. Students will also be practising forming lower case letters correctly using Victorian Modern Cursive Script and touch-typing.

 

Persuasive writing is used to express a point of view and persuade your reader to adopt your perspective. It is organised to include a statement of position, arguments and a concluding statement.

 

Important features of persuasive writing:

  • Emotive and powerful language
  • Facts and opinions
  • Rhetorical questions
  • Bold writing for emphasis

 

To support your child’s learning at home:

  • Share some persuasive texts e.g. advertisements on TV or print media.
  • Encourage your child to verbally persuade you to let them do something (increase pocket money, new bike) with justifiable and valid arguments.
  • Encourage your child to notice the features of a persuasive text (emotive language, bold writing, and fact and opinion) in all text types.
  • Create a debate/general conversation around topics such as cats are better than dogs, scooters are better than bikes.

 

Students will be explicitly taught the structure of an Information report (introduction, description, conclusion), based on a ‘Happy & Healthy Me’ topic.

 

To support your child’s learning, you may:

  • Encourage your child to read and write information reports.
  • When reading an information reports with your child, encourage them to notice the structure of the text and features such as facts, photographs, caption and labelled diagrams.
  • Discuss the difference between fact and opinion with your child.
  • Identify the text as a fiction or non-fiction.

 

Mathematics

This term we will be teaching place value, fractions, money, time, chance and probability, and mass. We will use concrete materials and encourage mental methods for solving problems. There will be a focus on discussing the strategies used by students.

 

To support your child with the above mathematical areas you may:

 

Place Value:

  • Use playing cards to make two or three digit numbers and ask your child to read the number and say the value of each digit. You could extend this by asking them to find the number that would be 10 more/10 less.
  • Play ‘Guess my Number’. Choose a secret number, and students have to guess the number using place value to describe the number. For example, ‘Is there a 2 in the hundreds place?’

 

Fractions:

  • Cut objects and food items into halves and quarters. Some students might also be ready to explore thirds, fifths and eighths.
  • Dividing collections of objects (counters, plastic animals, blocks) into two, three or four equal groups.

 

Money:

  • Encourage your child to add up their pocket money.
  • Identify and count the coins and notes in your wallet.
  • Encourage your child to calculate the change when shopping.

 

Chance and Probability:

  • Play dice games and discuss the chance of rolling different numbers.
  • Use the language of chance (possible, impossible, likely, unlikely, certain) to discuss the possibility of particular events occurring that day.

Term Two

Writing

This term we are focusing on Procedural and Narrative writing. Students will also be practising forming lower case letters correctly using Victorian Modern Cursive Script.

 

Procedural writing is the recording of any procedure, most often seen in real life examples including recipes and instructions of how to build different things. Important features of procedural texts:

  • Verbs
  • Lists
  • Sequenced steps

 

To support your child’s learning at home:

  • Follow some procedural texts at home
  • Discuss what might happen if you didn’t follow the procedure
  • Identify verbs in their reading

 

Students will be explicitly taught the structure of Narrative writing (orientation, complication, resolution), as well some ways to make their writing more interesting.

 

To support your child’s learning, you may:

  • Encourage your child to write narratives.
  • When reading a story with your child, ask them to identify the characters, setting, problem and resolution.
  • Point out descriptive language.

 

Mathematics

This term we will move from teaching addition and subtraction to multiplication and division. We use concrete materials and encourage mental methods for solving problems. Discussing the strategies students are using is very beneficial.

 

To support your child with multiplication you may:

  • Practise skip counting, first by 2s, 5s and 10s and then by other numbers.
  • Encourage students to think in groups of equal numbers.
  • Looking for arrays in their environment (things organised into equal rows and columns).

 

To support your child with division you may:

  • Practise solving division problems by sharing items equally by 1s (if I have 8 items and I need to share them out to 4 people, I give one item to each person until everyone has an equal amount)
  • Practise solving division problems by sharing items in groups (if I have 8 items and I need to share them out to 4 people, I give two to each person until everyone has an equal amount)

 

Term One

Reading
Students will practise reading at school every day and it is important for them to practise reading each day with an adult, or a fluent reader.

 

To support student reading at home:

  • Your child should read a take home book aloud to a fluent reader every day, to develop fluency.
  • Ask your child questions about the texts they are reading such as ‘Why do you think the character behaved that way?’, ‘What do you already know about this topic?’, “What did you learn?’, ‘What do you think will happen next?’ This will support comprehension.
  • You may choose appropriate texts to read to your child, in addition to them reading to you.
  • Your child will be given a goal by their teacher. Please read, discuss and practice this goal with your child.
  • Fairfield Primary School also has a subscription to ‘Reading Eggs’. You may wish to use this resource at home. Login details will be pasted in your child’s take home reading journal.

 

Mathematics
This term our focus in number is Counting and Place Value. Counting is an essential skill that underpins the understanding of number and algebra. Students should be able to count forwards and backwards by 1s as well as skip counting (e.g. 2, 4, 6). Place Value is the ability to know the value of each digit in a number. This is an essential skill for addition, subtraction, multiplication and division.

 

To support student numeracy at home:
Counting:

  • Count by 1s, or skip count as you walk to school. For example, you may count by 1s to find out how many steps it takes you to walk to school or, you may count the letter box numbers to count by 2s (e.g. 242, 244, 246).
  • Play board and card games such as ‘Snakes and Ladders’.
  • Play a game such as ‘Beat your Score’. Students choose a counting pattern to count by. They count for 1 minute and record their counting. When the timer goes off, reset the timer and students count by the same counting pattern; trying to beat their previous score.

 

Place Value:

  • Use playing cards to make two or three digit numbers and ask your child to read the number and say the value of each digit. You could extend this by asking them to find the number that would be 10 more/10 less.
  • Play ‘Guess my Number’. Choose a secret number, and students have to guess the number using place value to describe the number. For example, “Is there a 2 in the hundreds place”